America’s True First Flag

oh yessss,its very true.

oh yessss,its very true.

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10 comments

  1. thetruthisstrangerthanfiction · February 27, 2015

    Ok, I’m officially fascinated…(!) Could you point me to whatever sources you have for more background on this? (not contesting it, just wanting to know more about how to show other people the proof that this really indeed existed..)

    Liked by 1 person

    • dawnatilla · March 7, 2015

      HEY THERE.. yea sure give me a few hours Ill try to get that to you. now, the thing about real good information/truth is often.. or NEVER, DOCUMENTED(as if paper isnt the MOST EASILY tampered with evidence available!! haha)…so many people will have problems accepting it..even if it had live footage of it happening.

      Liked by 1 person

      • thetruthisstrangerthanfiction · March 8, 2015

        Yeah… this might be one of those instances where it winds up never being 100% possible to prove beyond a doubt. but at least for myself, I certainly believe it. I’ve more or less exhausted looking at the few places people have displayed it online, but, I know that somebody, SOMEWHERE, had to pull it out of some book or archive originally….

        Liked by 1 person

      • dawnatilla · March 8, 2015

        On July 4, 1776, Thomas Jefferson (a Mason and Illuminist), John Adams (a Mason), and Ben Franklin (a Mason and Rosicrucian), were appointed by a Committee of the Continental Congress to prepare the Great Seal of the United States to signify that the 13 states had united in an act of independence. After some preliminary work by another, William Barton submitted an Eagle on the pinnacle of a Doric column, the All-Seeing Eye, and the stars (representing a new constellation, or new empire). Barton’s second design pushed the All-Seeing Eye to the reverse side, and moved the eagle up to the crest, and placed a phoenix (the Egyptian symbol of regeneration used by the Rosicrucians) rising from the flames at the column’s summit, which was to indicate the revival of the new (America) out of the old (England). This design was accepted on May 9, 1782 and referred to Charles Thompson (a Mason), the Secretary of Congress on June 13th. The final version, approved and adopted by an act of Congress on June 20, 1782, was the result of a series of committee meetings which combined ideas from Barton, Thompson and Jefferson, who placed a triangle around the eye, added the year ‘1776’, ‘E Pluribus Unum’, the olive branch on the front, stars above the eagle, and other things. Within weeks, a brass plate of the face of the Great Seal was produced, but not the reverse side.
        Although the design of the seal was not to deviate from the one approved, when the original wore out, and a second engraving in 1841 was ordered by Secretary of State Daniel Webster. The design by French artist R. P. Lamplier and cut by John V. N. Throop, had many subtle differences, such as six, rather than thirteen arrows. Referred to as the Websterian Great Seal, it was used until 1885.
        The third engraving was prepared in 1885 under Secretary of State F. T. Frelinghuysen and cut by Tiffany and Co.; and the fourth engraving, under Secretary of State John Hay, engraved by Max Zeiler, and cut by Baily, Banks & Biddle; were both consistent with the design passed by law in 1782

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      • thetruthisstrangerthanfiction · March 8, 2015

        Yeah, I’ve read all this somewhere already. I understood Barton and all of that to be involved with designing the “great seal”, not the flag…. find any more?

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      • dawnatilla · March 8, 2015

        I suggest you go to BIBLIOTECAPLEYADES .NET.EXPANSIVE,ENDLESS DATA BASE.

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  2. dawnatilla · March 8, 2015

    That’s one..there’s more

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  3. dawnatilla · March 8, 2015

    There’s the rest of that article.

    Like

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